National Park Service

Central Alaska Network

Parks in this Network

                                
Central Alaska Network Map
Click to see Larger
Network Map
Find your park logo

Passerines

Overview

Contacts:

  • Carol McIntyre

Park Units:

Resource Brief

Passerine species are monitored in all three Network parks using repeat count surveys conducted along roads as well as in select mini-grids and other off-road areas during early summer. During each standard three-minute point count, all birds heard and all birds seen within 400m of the point are recorded. Survey routes are located along the Denali Road, the McCarthy and Nebesna Roads in Wrangell-St. Elias, and along the northern section of the Taylor Highway in Yukon-Charley Rivers. Detection of song birds is strongly correlated to habitat and the timing of surveys. Therefore, in addition to recording birds, other data are collected during surveys as well, including covariates for detection, environmental variables, and number of passing motorized vehicles. Between 1992 and 2008, several different techniques were employed to determine the most appropriate field techniques to meet the objectives of the monitoring program. Recent analysis by Network staff of repeat count data collected annually in Denali from 1994 and 2005 demonstrates the need for monitoring programs to address all components of the detection process, including probabilities of presence and availability. The current two-stage methods of repeat point counts address these components and meet the objectives of the monitoring program. The analysis and associated recommendations are published in the April 2013 issue of Biological Conservation. Land birds comprise more than 70% of the bird species in the CAKN. Passerines, or song birds, are an important component of park ecosystems. Their high body temperature, rapid metabolism, and high ecological position in most food webs make them a good indicator of the effects of local and regional changes in ecosystems; they often respond quickly to changes in their environment. Of all the vertebrates that occur in Central Alaska Network, passerines are easy and economical to detect and a single survey can cover many species. Passerines include a wide variety of species that occupy many habitats over many environmental gradients and may represent unique response variables relative to changes in vegetation. Objectives 1. Population Trends of Common Species. Monitor population trends of common passerine species during the breeding season in each network park with methods that also allow the data to contribute to detection of statewide trends. 2. Community Composition and Distribution. Detect longterm changes in the distribution and composition of breeding passerine bird communities in each network park in relation to changes in their habitats. 3. Integration. Using data from the vegetation and other components of the CAKN Vital Signs monitoring program, develop and update habitat models for common passerine species and for species of conservation concern. Link changes in passerine abundance and distribution to changes in vegetation and other environmental attributes. These linkages will provide insight into the relationships among ecosystem components. 4. Ecology of Species of Conservation Concern. For passerine bird species of conservation concern (due to declining population trends) within Alaska/western Canada, provide demographic information and detect changes in demographic parameters for selected populations within CAKN parks. Current species of conservation concern include olive-sided flycatcher, gray-cheeked thrush, arctic warbler, blackpoll warbler, and rusty blackbird. `

Products

Citation Year Type Access Holdings IRMA
Download CAKN_Passerine_2015_2016_AnnualReport_24_July_2017.pdf Phillips LM and Others. 2017. Monitoring passerine birds in the Central Alaska Network: 2015 and 2016 summary report for the Central Alaska Network Inventory and Monitoring Program. Natural Resource Report. NPS/CAKN/NRR—2017/1478. National Park Service. Fort Collins, Colorado 2017 Published Report Public 1 Link to https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2242546
Download CAKN_Passerine_2013-2014_Final.pdf Mcintyre CL and Others. 2015. Monitoring passerine birds in the Central Alaska Monitoring Network: 2013 - 2014 annual progress report for the Central Alaska Vital Signs Monitoring Program. Natural Resource Data Series. NPS/CAKN/NRDS—2015/964. National Park Service. Fort Collins, Colorado 2015 Published Report Public 1 Link to https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2223709
Download RB_CAKN_Passerines_OCT13_FINAL.pdf National Park Service. 2013. Monitoring passerines in the Central Alaska Network 2013 Resource Brief Public 1 Link to https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2204195
Download Schmidt_et_al._2013_(passerine_birds_repeated_counts_and_detection).pdf Schmidt JH and Others. 2013. Accounting for incomplete detection: What are we estimating and how might it affect long-term passerine monitoring programs?. Biological Conservation. 160:130–139 2013 Journal Article Public 1 Link to https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2196850
Click to view holdings Hoekman ST and Lindberg MS. Point transect sampling for monitoring passerine birds in Denali National Park and Preserve: An assessment of 2002-2008 pilot data. Natural Resource Technical Report. NPS/CAKN/NRTR—2012/589. National Park Service. Fort Collins, Colorado (2 holdings) 2008 Published Report Public 2 Link to https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2185664
Download Monitoring_Passerine_Birds_Annual_Report_2007_CAKN_final_v2_sm.pdf McIntyre C. 2007. Monitoring Passerine Birds in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska: 2007 Progress Report. National Park Service Central Alaska Inventory and Monitoring Network. Fairbanks, AK 2007 Unpublished Report Public 1 Link to https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2221091
Download Monitoring_Passerine_Birds_Annual_Report_2006_sm.pdf McIntyre C. 2006. Monitoring Passerine Birds in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska: 2006 Progress Report. National Park Service Central Alaska Inventory and Monitoring Network. Fairbanks, AK 2006 Unpublished Report Public 1 Link to https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2221090
Kozie K. 1996. Breeding bird surveys in Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve, 1995-1996 (No holdings or the holding is external. Consult the IRMA reference) 1996 Published Report Internal 0 Link to https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/143166
Kozie K. 1994. Breeding Bird Surveys in Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve, 1993-1994 (No holdings or the holding is external. Consult the IRMA reference) 1994 Published Report Internal 0 Link to https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/171236
Cook MB. 1991. Avian habitat classification for the west end of the McCarthy road, Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve// (Internal) 1991 Unpublished Report Internal 1 Link to https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/170304
Download 1990_Beck_Nabesna_BBS_habitat_classification.pdf Beck K. 1990. The Avian Habitat Classification for the Nabesna Road Breeding Bird Transect, Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve 1990 Unpublished Report Public 1 Link to https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/171238
Download Monitoring_Passerine_Birds_Annual_Report_2005.pdf McIntyre C. Monitoring Trends of Passerine Birds in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska: 2005 Progress Report. National Park Service Central Alaska Inventory and Monitoring Network Unpublished Report Public 1 Link to https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2221089


Details

Key words: alaska, bird, breeding, community, composition, denali, distribution, monitoring, national park, passerine, population, trend

Subject Category:

  • Ecological Framework: Biological Integrity | Focal Species or Communities | Birds

View this project 'Passerine Monitoring in the Central Alaska Network of National Parklands' on the IRMA Data Store | JSON | XML | Project reference last updated on 2017-11-30 07:24:24 by MCMacCluskie@nps.gov

Last Updated: July 14, 2017 Contact Webmaster