National Park Service

Mojave Desert I&M Network (MOJN)

Inventory & Monitoring at Mojave National Preserve

Desert Tortoise at Mojave National Preserve
Desert Tortoise at Mojave National Preserve

Mojave National Preserve (MOJA) was established in 1994 as part of the California Desert Protection Act. The land encompassed by MOJA spans 1.6 million acres, making it the third largest unit of the national park system in the contiguous United States. Located in the southern California and bordered to the north and south by major interstate highways, I-15 and I-40, the Preserve is an expanse of desert lands from three of the four major North American deserts: the Great Basin, Sonoran, and Mojave. The Preserve has a vast amount of natural and cultural resources that warrant monitoring and management protection.

MOJN provides natural resource inventory and monitoring information to assist MOJA in effective, science-based decision making for resource protection and management purposes. Inventories have been completed for mammals, fish, birds, vascular plants, and reptiles & amphibians (for full species lists select from the dropdown box below). In December of 2015, MOJN established 35 long-term monitoring plots within the mixed creosote community of Mojave in order to collect plant and soils data at 3-year intervals. The Integrated Uplands Protocol describes the data collection procedures carried out at these plots. The Selected Large Springs and Desert Springs describe MOJN's water monitoring efforts at MOJA, which include measuring water quality and availability at MC Spring, an iconic water source due to the rare Mohave tui chub that inhabits it, as well as nearly 100 smaller water sources such as seeps and springs. MOJN also published a report on the use of historic photographs to reconstruct the water level at MC Spring from 1990 to 2015. MOJA's Geologic Resources Map is now complete, with the Report scheduled for publication in 2017.


List Species Found at Mojave National Preserve

Select a Species Category (optional):

What's the difference?

A Checklist contains only those species that are designated as "present" or "probably present" in the park.

The Full List with Details includes all the Checklist species plus species that are unconfirmed, historically detected, or incorrectly reported in the park. The Full List also contains species that are "in review" because their status in the park hasn't been fully determined. Additional details about the status of each species is included in the Full List.

The Checklist will almost always contain fewer species than the Full List.

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Newsletters
Invasive Plant Species Guides and Briefs
Recent Climate Change Exposure Briefs
Biological Inventory Briefs

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Air
Baseline Water Quality
Climate and Weather
Geology
Natural Resource Condition Assessments
Paleontology
Plants and Animals
Soils
Vegetation Mapping
Other Inventories and Assessments

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Integrated Upland
Selected Large Springs
Streams and Lakes

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MOJN Planning Documents
Integrated Uplands
Selected Large Springs
Streams and Lakes

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New! MOJN Invasive Plant Guide

External Publications (Journal Articles, Book Chapters, etc.)

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Species Summary from iNaturalist (non-NPS data)

This species list is provided by iNaturalist.org and is not confirmed or endorsed by NPS

View this list on the iNaturalist site instead

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Last Updated: December 30, 2016 Contact Webmaster