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Northeast Temperate Network (NETN)

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Canda Geese in migration flight over the colored hills of Vermont as seen from Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller NHP
Canda Geese in migration flight over the colored hills of Vermont as seen from Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller NHP. Ed Sharron photo.
  • Determine the trend in phenology of key species, in order to assist park managers with the detection and mitigation of the effects of climate change on park resources. An additional programatic goal is to interest and educate park visitors and a cadre of volunteer monitors.

Status:

approved

Download Program Brief:

Phenology program birief download link

Phenology can be described as the study of the timing of recurring biological events, the causes of their timing, and the relationship among phases of the same or different species. Phenological events include flowering, leaf out, migrations, hibernation, and other similar seasonal biological events. They are also crucial for many aspects of human life - e.g., agriculture, gardening, health, cultural events, and recreation - and nearly all ecological relationships and processes -e.g., plant-pollinator and predator-prey relationships, competition, and carbon and water cycling.

The overall goal of NETN’s phenology monitoring protocol is to determine trends in the phenology of key species in order to assist park managers with the detection and mitigation of the effects of climate change on park resources. An additional programmatic goal is to involve and educate park visitors and staff, as well as a cadre of volunteer monitors. Phenology is particularly well-suited to volunteer monitoring because it is both easy to observe and engaging to volunteers, and according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), "is perhaps the simplest process in which to track changes in the ecology of species in response to climate change".In support of these goals, NETN’s phenology protocol focuses network-wide efforts on a short list of selected species in order to provide sufficient data to determine trends. Fifteen plant and 12 animal species occurring within two core habitats (Northern hardwood forest and Vernal pools) and five optional park habitats have been selected for phenology monitoring.

This protocol was developed in collaboration with the USA National Phenological Network (USA-NPN; www.usanpn.org). The USA-NPN promotes broad understanding of plant and animal phenology and makes phenology data and related information freely available to scientists, resource managers and the public to aid in decision-making and adaptation to changing environmental conditions.


NETN Phenology Monitoring Materials

Displaying latest version of protocol. For earlier versions, click "See full bibliographic record" and scroll down to Version History

Volunteer Manual

NETN Phenology Monitoring Volunteer Guide

National Phenology Network Website

NPN Nature's Notebook Home

Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller NHP Google Earth Module

Citizen Scientist Phenoloy Monitoring Sites

Volunteer Training Powerpoint

Phenology Monitoring Volunteer Powerpoint 2017 (118 MB)

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Northeast Temperate Network Staff Contacts for Phenology Monitoring

Name Title/Position Phone Number Email Address
Aaron Weed Program Manager 802-457-3368
ex. 237
aaron_weed@nps.gov
Fred Dieffenbach Environmental Monitoring Coordinator - Appalachian NST 802-457-3368 ex 236 fred_dieffenbach@nps.gov
Adam Kozlowski Data Manager 802-457-3368 ex 240 adam_kozlowski@nps.gov
Ed Sharron Science Communication Specialist 802-457-3368 ex 223 ed_sharron@nps.gov
Last Updated: October 17, 2017 Contact Webmaster