National Park Service

South Florida/Caribbean I&M Network (SFCN)

Invasive Species Monitoring

Orinoco Sailfin catfish (Pterygoplichthys multiradiatus), a popular aquarium fish, caught during exotic fish sampling.
Orinoco Sailfin catfish (Pterygoplichthys multiradiatus), a popular aquarium fish, caught during exotic fish sampling.

Invasive/exotic plants and invasive/exotic animals are among the most serious threats to maintaining ecological integrity in South Florida / Caribbean Network (SFCN) parks and ranked 5th and 12th respectively in importance as Vital Signs. The National Park Service Exotic Plant Management Team (EPMT), parks, and partners are already engaged in monitoring of existing known threats. SFCN is instead developing protocols for early detection of new threats, i.e., "Early Detection of Invasive / Exotic Plants" and "Non-native fish in canals", in cooperation with EPMT, park staff, and university partners. SFCN is also assisting with analysis as needed of invasive plant species Digital Aerial Sketch-mapping conducted by EPMT in cooperation with the state of Florida. In addition SFCN will be linking to monitoring and reports by parks and partners as appropriate.

Individual vital signs in this category are also listed in the table below.

Vital Signs Monitored by the SFCN and Our Partners

Vital Signs Category Monitored by SFCN
and Partners
Monitored by Partners Only and/or Deferred**
Invasive Species

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Last Updated: March 28, 2017 Contact Webmaster